Donald Trump’s Statements Criticized By Philanthropist George Soros

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The latest statements made by Donald Trump have drawn the attention of billionaire philanthropist George Soros, the hedge fund manager and founder of the Open Society Foundations. In an interview first published in Forbes Soros revealed his thoughbts on the New York real estate mogul turned politician; George Soros revealed his thoughts that the decision by Trump to call for a ban on Muslim people entering the U.S. was ill timed. In the current political climate and growing European migrant crisis the rhetoric of the Republican Presidential hopeful was assisting the terrorist organizations of the world, according to Soros.

The problem of ISIS and the ongoing conflict in Syria are of grave concern for Soros, who has been a major supporter of bringing democracy to areas of the world through his Open Society Foundations since 1979. Soros believes the timing of Trump’s statements could hardly of been worse and accused him of doing the work of ISIS and other terrorist groups for them. The ongoing conflict in Syria is one of the major issues facing the world as a whole, but definitely causing concern for the people of Europe who are seeing an influx of refugees from the Middle East.

Making the issue of Syrian even more of a problem for the people of Europe is seen by George Soros as a bad decision for Trump, largely because the billionaire believes the European Union could collapse under the refugee crisis. The influx of Syrian refugees has arrived as many European countries are struggling as members of the Euro zone; Greece and Ukraine are the major countries at risk of destroying the delicate financial situation in Europe in the view of George Soros.

The crumbling financial and social across Europe has seen the U.K. government call for a referendum on continuing the membership of the continent wide community. George Soros believes the future of the entire European Union could hinge on the decision of the British public, largely because the amount of trade completed between Europe and Britain would be difficult to replace.